Smoked Deviled Eggs

1:45 - Prep 0:45 / Cook 1:00
Beginner

Topped with bacon and sprinkled with your favorite barbecue rub, these Smoked Deviled Eggs have a distinctly delicious flavor. Begin by cold smoking hard boiled eggs for that rich, smoky flavor. Then add some hot sauce for a touch of spice. Bring them along to a picnic or cookout and watch them disappear.

6 Servings
Ingredients
Topping
  • handful apple and alder blend wood chips
  • 1/4 cup crumbled bacon
  • 2 tablespoons barbecue rub
Eggs
  • 12 large eggs
  • handful apple and alder blend wood chips
Deviled Egg Mixture
  • 12 egg yolks
  • 1/3 cup mayonnaise
  • 1 tablespoon old-fashioned mustard
  • 2 teaspoons chopped fresh dill
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • a few dashes of Louisiana-style hot sauce
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Preparation
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Steps
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Step 1 Of 9
1. Place eggs in a large saucepan. Cover completely with cold water and bring to a boil. As soon as the water starts to boil, turn off the heat. Cover the saucepan and let rest for 15 minutes.
2. Transfer eggs to a bowl filled with ice cold water to cool down completely, about 20 minutes.
3. Preheat your smoker for cold smoking. Place three lit briquettes in the center of your firebox and adjust the vents to 10% open.
4. Lightly crackle the shell all around each egg and peel with your hands.
Hot TipHold eggs under running water for easier shell removal.
5. Toss a handful of wood chips onto the hot coals for smoking.
6. Place eggs in smoker. Cold smoke for 1 hour, keeping the temperature below 110°F.
Hot TipThe eggs are finished smoking when they turn a light brown color.
7. Remove eggs from the smoker and slice in half lengthwise. Using a spoon, gently remove the yolk from each egg. Place all yolks in a large bowl.
8. Combine the cooked egg yolks with mayonnaise, mustard, dill, garlic powder and a few dashes of hot sauce. Stir until creamy.
9. Scoop about 2 tablespoons of deviled egg mixture into each egg half. Top with crumbled bacon and sprinkle with your favorite barbecue rub.
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